On writing-not-writing, and the ‘slow science’ of ‘Covid-time’

Guest Blogger Catherine (Cait) McCullagh reflects on 'Covid-time' in her final year of her PhD. “This will be perfect for you”, one of my friends writes. They know that I am in the third year of my full-time practice-based research, with the field of my practice – and those who participated in this endeavour with … Continue reading On writing-not-writing, and the ‘slow science’ of ‘Covid-time’

From Contempt to Clapping: British Doctors during Cholera and Coronavirus

Guest blogger Charlotte Orr provides a brief insight into her MLitt dissertation on the links between the 1831-1832 British cholera pandemic and the professionalisation of medicine and its relevance today. Doctors rightly have a serious amount of cultural cachet: COVID-19 ‘clap for our carers’ has given us all a chance, for a short time on … Continue reading From Contempt to Clapping: British Doctors during Cholera and Coronavirus

 PhD and OCD in the Time of Coronavirus

Our latest Guest Blogger discusses their PhD experience while dealing with OCD and the COVID-19 outbreak. Pandemic, Contagion, Outbreak. I ardently read these books by Robin Cook when I was about twelve years old, dreamt about becoming a virologist studying deadly viruses. This was before I developed OCD. I have been living with OCD for some years now … Continue reading  PhD and OCD in the Time of Coronavirus

Garlic, Potatoes and Swords: Nineteenth-Century Quarantine at Sea

In the nineteenth century, the most frequent form of quarantine was rather different to the lockdown Scotland is experiencing now. Guest Blogger Lindsay Middleton explains: Rather than being confined to their homes and stopping travel, nineteenth-century quarantine largely affected those who engaged in commercial and leisure travel all over the globe. Namely, ships that were … Continue reading Garlic, Potatoes and Swords: Nineteenth-Century Quarantine at Sea

PhDs During Lockdown

PhD researchers share how they’re making progress with their work despite restrictions posed by the lockdown. For some, being forced to stay indoors and get some work done has worked out to be advantageous. But for others – with caring and/or childcare responsibilities, anxiety, disrupted research trips and halted field research – it’s difficult to … Continue reading PhDs During Lockdown