From Contempt to Clapping: British Doctors during Cholera and Coronavirus

Guest blogger Charlotte Orr provides a brief insight into her MLitt dissertation on the links between the 1831-1832 British cholera pandemic and the professionalisation of medicine and its relevance today. Doctors rightly have a serious amount of cultural cachet: COVID-19 ‘clap for our carers’ has given us all a chance, for a short time on … Continue reading From Contempt to Clapping: British Doctors during Cholera and Coronavirus

 PhD and OCD in the Time of Coronavirus

Our latest Guest Blogger discusses their PhD experience while dealing with OCD and the COVID-19 outbreak. Pandemic, Contagion, Outbreak. I ardently read these books by Robin Cook when I was about twelve years old, dreamt about becoming a virologist studying deadly viruses. This was before I developed OCD. I have been living with OCD for some years now … Continue reading  PhD and OCD in the Time of Coronavirus

PhDs During Lockdown

PhD researchers share how they’re making progress with their work despite restrictions posed by the lockdown. For some, being forced to stay indoors and get some work done has worked out to be advantageous. But for others – with caring and/or childcare responsibilities, anxiety, disrupted research trips and halted field research – it’s difficult to … Continue reading PhDs During Lockdown

On Precarious Pedagogical Practices; Or, Being Paid Very Little to Do a Lot

Our latest guest post is from Joshua Phillips (University of Glasgow) on the underpaid teaching conditions he – and many others – currently face, strike action and proposing a pedagogy based on transparency, openness and honesty. The JEF (Josh Exploitation Framework): What, How, Why? If you’re reading this, then chances are you’re on a casual … Continue reading On Precarious Pedagogical Practices; Or, Being Paid Very Little to Do a Lot